Agri supply chief congratulates NI Grain Trade Association

Prizewinners in the quiz which took place at the NIGTA quarterly meeting are pictured with David Caffall, left, Chief Executive AIC, Guest Speaker; and Alan Johnston, right, NIGTA President,  Back row from left:  David Garrett; Stephen Agnew and Alan Bristow. Front -Beth Tyers, Amanda Keys, and Alison Lowham. Missing from the photograph is Rachel Murray who was joint first prizewinner with Amanda Keys. Photograph: Columba O'Hare
Prizewinners in the quiz which took place at the NIGTA quarterly meeting are pictured with David Caffall, left, Chief Executive AIC, Guest Speaker; and Alan Johnston, right, NIGTA President, Back row from left: David Garrett; Stephen Agnew and Alan Bristow. Front -Beth Tyers, Amanda Keys, and Alison Lowham. Missing from the photograph is Rachel Murray who was joint first prizewinner with Amanda Keys. Photograph: Columba O'Hare
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“The feed trade in Northern Ireland is led by a highly effective and well coordinated body delivering benefit to businesses in the sector and agriculture in general.”

These were the words of David Caffall, Chief Executive of Agricultural Industries Confederation (AIC) speaking to a meeting of the Northern Ireland Grain Trade Association (NIGTA) which is its affiliated organisation in the province.

Mr Caffall continued: “The recent agreement on a closer working relationship between AIC and NIGTA whereby businesses are offered joint membership of both organisations – ensures that they have a voice not just locally but also in Whitehall and Brussels.

“The significant increase in the NIGTA membership in the last year would suggest that this has been well received by the trade.

“The development of assurance schemes to safeguard the industry, the formation of a feed adviser register which recognises and develops expertise in advice delivered on farm and the proactive response to the environmental issues around Greenhouse Gas and the Nitrates directive are all evidence of the positive role the trade has played in the wider industry – and of course the Food Fortress program developed with Queens University, has put Northern Ireland in a world leading position in the field of feed and food safety.”

Mr Caffall also spoke of the volume of legislation which businesses are subject to.

He continued: “The environment regulations apply not only to farms but also to feed mills and are ever more restrictive and expensive to comply with. Concerns about the build up of antibiotic resistance in humans (AMR) will mean significant changes to the procedures for ordering and production of medicated feeds which will inevitably add to costs.

“We continue to lobby hard to ensure that regulation does not damage the competitiveness of businesses in the feed and supply sector.

“On the positive side we are pleased to see increased recognition of the excellent assurance schemes which we have created to ensure high standards of quality and safety throughout the trade.

“We have convinced the regulators that businesses with a good record of compliance and who are members of the relevant assurance schemes are low risk and should receive a ‘lighter touch’ in terms of inspections. This is an important principle - given that we can expect the cost of official controls to be borne by the industry in the future.”

Mr Caffall will deliver one of the keynote papers at next week’s prestigeous Oxford Farming Conference on the theme of ‘Supply Chain in the Balance’ which will explore the threats and opportunities which face the industry.