Facelift for Ardress House

Ardress House, South and West elevations, following the removal of cement render in preparation for lime render to be applied

Ardress House, South and West elevations, following the removal of cement render in preparation for lime render to be applied

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Traditional skills are being kept alive with the re-rendering of Ardress House in County Armagh. This charming 17th-century farmhouse is undergoing a facelift thanks to a significant investment from the National Trust.

The conservation charity, is investing £120,000 to reintroduce the original façade of the house and restore it to its former glory.

Edward Mason, general manager for National Trust Mid-Ulster properties said: “When Dublin architect George Ensor built Ardress House in the 1700s, building techniques and materials were very different from those used in the last 50 years. The original façade was made of weatherproof materials to protect the walls, however in the 1960s a cement-based render was applied to Ardress. This left the building susceptible to problems with damp, cracking render and flaking paint, caused by trapped moisture.”

“To ensure protection of the farmhouse a lime render will be used due to its distinct advantages over cement based render. Lime is less dense and more breathable and closer in strength to many of the types of material used by the Ensors.”