BYGONE DAYS: Auction to be held to sell valuable freehold farm

Mr David Morgan, Lagavar Road, Magheracastle, Ballycastle, with Ballintoy Field Sailor, winner of the class for bulls born on or after September 1, 1971. The animal was owned by his father Mr S J Morgan. They are pictured at Ballymena Livestock Market in September 1972
Mr David Morgan, Lagavar Road, Magheracastle, Ballycastle, with Ballintoy Field Sailor, winner of the class for bulls born on or after September 1, 1971. The animal was owned by his father Mr S J Morgan. They are pictured at Ballymena Livestock Market in September 1972

It was reported this week in 1926 that Mr William Orr had been instructed to sell by auction at the Belfast Mart, 61, Chichester Street, Friday, September 21 a valuable farm known as ‘Conlig’ and consisting of 70 statute acres, held for ever, subject to the nominal rent of £1 10d, writes Darryl Armitage.

It was reported that there was a comfortable and commodious dwelling-house thereon, approached at Short Avenue from County Road, with tastefully laid-out grounds in front, and good orchard; also substantially-built offices, all slated and in good repair.

A stable for three horses, three loose boxes, byres 20 cows, young cattle houses with loft over byres and stables, feeding-house, cart shed, fowl-house etc, forming an enclosed yard, in which there is a pump with never-failing water supply. There was also a slated tenant house farm. The lands, which arc nearly all pasture, are of superior quality and in good condition, well manured, thoroughly drained and fenced, and plentifully supplied with water. The auctioneers would draw special attention to this sale.

This farm “is well suited for both dairy and tillage purposes, and is conveniently situated about 21 miles from Castlereagh Road tram terminus, adjoining the county road, convenient to leading road Belfast Ballygowan”. Part purchase money can remain. F J ORR, Solicitor, 47, Chichester Street, Belfast and Comber.

Clean milk production observed by Belfast newspaper representatives

It was reported by the Belfast News Letter this week in September 1926 that representatives of the Belfast Press were afforded opportunity of visiting the Park Dairy Farm, Dunmurry, and examining the methods of milk production employed there.

From this farm is sold only Grade A (tubercular tested) milk “that is to say, the, pure natural product with, its natural food value unimpaired”.

The party was conducted over the farm Major W W Dobbin, the agent, and Professor H Rae, the Research Department, Ministry of Agriculture for Northern Ireland. It was explained that for years milk has been produced at this farm under ordinary conditions, but that recently it was decided to distribute only the Grade A, variety. This entailed a vast amount of reconstruction and reorganisation.

The then existing herd of cattle was subjected to stringent tests by Mr S R Thompson, MRCVS. Such cows as did not fulfil, the required conditions were disposed of. The keynote of the entire proceeding was “scrupulous cleanliness”, and it was noteworthy that the operator cleaned his or her hands after each cow had been milked before going to the next one.

The milk went from the byres to the dairy, and was sent down a metal shute, over a cooling area, and thence straight into bottles which were capped.

From start to finish the milk comes from the cow direct to the consumer, without being boiled or pasteurised, or subjected to any treatment which might detract from its natural qualities.