BYGONE DAYS: St lves boats can take ‘double quantity of fish as Irish boats’

Mr James McCaughren, Lismoyle, Kilrea, Coleraine, Co Londonderry, with his Friesian bull, Gortdonel Pan 36th, winner of the class for animals born on or after September 1, 1971. They are pictured at Ballymena Livestock Market in September 1972
Mr James McCaughren, Lismoyle, Kilrea, Coleraine, Co Londonderry, with his Friesian bull, Gortdonel Pan 36th, winner of the class for animals born on or after September 1, 1971. They are pictured at Ballymena Livestock Market in September 1972

It was reported that fishing vessels from Arklow had had a successful time fishing for herring off the coast of Ardglass in Co Down. So much so that “their nets have burst from the weight of fish and obliged them to go home to repair”, writes Darryl Armitage.

This never happens to the St Ives boats, as their nets are made of a stouter yarn, and a closer misk, and by being regularly barked, a field of St lves nets is reckoned to last 12 and 14 years, for herring fishery and after that is over, for pilchard fishery on their own coast whereas the Irish nets seldom last beyond a season and in the end are more expensive, and less profitable to the owner.

From the fineness of the thread, barking would have little effect, if the poor could afford it.

It was remarked: “If the St lves nets could be introduced, it would be the greatest improvement, but this can only be done by capitalists, who can make the advance, entering into the trade, as is the case at St Ives, where the fishermen are hired servants at wages, whereas all the Irish fishermen are at shares.”

It was also noted that “a most extensive improvement” is now going on in the harbour, extending the pier 160 feet into deep water; to which, if a jetty be added, it will render Ardglass the most important harbour of shelter on the eastern coast of Ireland, as it is the only harbour that has deep water, with a clear entrance at anytime of tide.

“It is built with the largest Welsh limestone from Anglesey I have ever seen, bedded in Aberthaw mortar, cut and close joined.”

Top price of 160gns paid for bull calf at Balmoral sale

The highest price paid at the cattle sales of the Royal Ulster Agricultural Society’s autumn show at Balmoral this week in 1951 was 160 guineas, which Mr J Quatte of Islandmagee, paid to Mr J Mulligan, Corbet. Banbridge for Brague Lord Premier this week in 1951.

This animal was awarded class prize and special prize at the judging.

The award for champion the show was won by Clareview Morning Dew, an Ayrshire heifer, owned by Mr A Stevenson, Ballyclare.

Hereford heifer, calved between September, 1949, and December 31, 1950, 1, 2, and 3 J Wood, Millisle, Mlllbank Graceful, Millbank Princess and Mlllbank Peggy, second, reserve, A J Davis, Lisburn, Townview Chaplet.

Dairy shorthorns: 125gns, R Stewart, Stewartstown, Co Tyrone, Templereagh Roving Boy to R Duncan. Magherafelt; R Gray, Moneymore, Moonbeam to H Gillespie, Klllylea, Co Armagh. 100Gns, I S Duncan, Crumlln, Lennymore Darling to J F Crothers, Castlebellingham; G and S J Ward, Dromore, Co Down, Dromore Roan Judge to A and H Irwin, Aughnacloy. Co Tyrone.

Comparative prices: The following is a summary of the sales, compared with those for last year: One dairy shorthorn cow. £65, 12s, 6d compared with £73, 10s; one dairy shorthorn heifer, £47, 5s (four heifers, average £45, 18s, 9d): 13 dairy shorthorn bulls, average £82 (10 bulls, average £79, 9s 8d; two Ayrshire cows, average £103, 8s, 6d (two cows, average £5,6 3s, 6d); Ayrshire heifers, average £67, 13s, 8d, (28 heifers average £51 9s 9d); 19 Ayrshire bulls, £62 13s, 3d (24 bulls, average £42, 3s, 1d).