Caltech: Crystalyx confirms strong five-year growth at Athenry sheep event

Enjoying their day at the Athenry sheep event are Lewis Morrow, Carrickfergus; Robbie Morrow, Carrickfergus; Edward Adamson, National Sheep Association, Luke Morgan, Caltech: Crystalyx and David Morgan, Caltech Crystalyx
Enjoying their day at the Athenry sheep event are Lewis Morrow, Carrickfergus; Robbie Morrow, Carrickfergus; Edward Adamson, National Sheep Association, Luke Morgan, Caltech: Crystalyx and David Morgan, Caltech Crystalyx

Caltech: Crystalyx had a major presence at this year’s National Sheep Event, held recently at Teagasc Athenry. The company used the event to further strengthen their position as one of Ireland’s leading ranges of livestock feed licks.

“Our market share has increased steadily over the last five years,” said National Manager David Morgan. “This reflects the satisfaction of farmers in using our products but also the tremendous working relationship that we enjoy with all our retail partners.”

Morgan also had a very strong advisory message for flock owners attending Athenry this year.

“Weaning is now taking place on farms across the country,” he added.

“This is a critical time for growing lambs as their nutritional levels must be maintained, so as to ensure that daily growth rates are fully maintained, once they come off their mothers’ milk.

“However, forage quality is far from adequate at the present time. Grass growth rates have been halted, in the wake of the current dry spell, and what grass there is available is extremely mature and of very poor quality.”

Morgan went on to point out that Crystalyx can significantly and economically improve animal performance for sheep.

Independent trial work carried out at Newcastle University has shown that Crystalyx increases the rate of forage digestion by rumen bacteria (by up to 10%). In turn, this stimulates forage intakes due to a reduced gut fill effect, increasing grass intake rather than replacing it.

And that’s not all! Crystalyx also increases forage digestibility (D value), so animals actually get more energy out of what they eat.

Morgan added: “Crystalyx provides all the minerals, trace elements and vitamins needed to balance grass, which is essential for optimum animal performance and health.

“But the rumen bugs also need minerals to help them digest the grass and the little and often trickle feeding system supplied by Crystalyx is an ideal method of ensuring this.

“Crystalyx also provides a concentrated source of sugar. This is important to help maintain rumen digestive efficiency.

“Weaned lambs will benefit from access to Crystalyx whilst at grass but may take a couple of weeks to get used to the licks, if they have not been fed them before. Intakes are typically only 20-30g/day for these smaller animals.

“Crystalyx products improve the performance of grazing animals and the profitability of livestock farmers on four continents.”

Meanwhile, the ‘fly season’ is about to get into full swing and with it comes the enhanced risk of pre-calving cows and in-calf heifers becoming predisposed to Summer Mastitis.

However, the good news is that Crystalyx Garlyx represents a natural way of protecting cattle – and sheep- from biting insects. The product has also been specifically formulated to maximise animal performance by stimulating forage intake and digestion.

“The natural, high-sulphur compounds in garlic act as an insect repellent which ward off flies and other biting insects,” David Morgan confirmed.

“The tubs and buckets can be conveniently put out in fields and paddocks with stock throughout the grazing season.

Crystalyx Garlyx is ideally provided to livestock at a time when flies and biting insects are extremely prevalent. If livestock are stressed and or irritated then they are less likely to graze, therefore becoming less productive.

Garlyx acts to make livestock’s skin less attractive to biting insects. In such instances, they are less likely to bother livestock. The natural garlic contained in Garlyx is consumed by livestock with every lick, and over the days that follow the garlic passes through the animal and is secreted out from pores in the skin. This produces an invisible barrier around livestock, which flies and other biting insects find repellent.