Genus ABS builds state of the art calf facility

The state of the art calf facility at near Madison, Wisconsin, USA
The state of the art calf facility at near Madison, Wisconsin, USA

A state of the art calf facility, which has such an emphasis on animal welfare and disease prevention, that even experts from the food industry had an input into its construction, has just been announced by Genus ABS.

Ever the industry leader, Genus ABS has built a facility, named Future Genetics, dedicated to house and care for bull calves under six-months-old.

The state of the art calf facility is dedicated to house and care for bull calves under six-months-old

The state of the art calf facility is dedicated to house and care for bull calves under six-months-old

The facility, located near Madison, Wisconsin, USA, allows ABS staff to improve care for animals through better nutrition, veterinary care and biosecurity at an earlier age.

In the past, bulls were purchased from breeders at about eight-months-old. Today, through genomics, bull calves that are identified as genetically superior can be brought in between two- and three-months-old.

Ervin McKinstry, Ireland manager for Genus ABS commented: “Due to the high value elite genomic animals can generate, having these calves under our expert care sooner ensures we maximize their potential.”

The state of the art facility was built with future expansion in mind.

Currently housing approximately 45 calves, the facility was also designed to be as labour efficient as possible and is considered the highest bio-secure facility on the ABS campus.

The facility is designed to maintain separation between calves from different sources.

Of course, health of the calves is of utmost priority.

Calves are grouped so there is a gap between housing units to avoid nose-to-nose contact and possible spread of disease or infection.

With the assistance of a sanitation expert from the food industry, a state of the art water purification system has been installed at the site to help eliminate spread of disease.

Once calves reach about six months, they advance to the Gorman arrival facility.

Built in 2014, this was the single-largest facility investment at $3.4 million.