Hosepipe ban: Tips on how you can save water this summer - including checking the plumbing for leaks

The scorching temperatures are set to return this week

As temperatures shoot up across the UK, some water companies have started taking measures to save water including  imposing hosepipe bans - so you might be thinking of ways you can do your part.

Whether it’s taking a shower instead of a bath, or using a watering can to water the plants, there are plenty of ways the general public can save a bit of water.

Water regulator Ofwat has listed nine of the best ways for people to cut down on the amount of water they use.

Nine tips for saving water during a heatwave

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    1. Use a bowl in the sink when washing fruit, vegetables or dishes. You can then use the waste water to water your plants.
    2. Fill a jug of water and put it in the fridge for when you want a cool drink.
    3. Turn off the tap when you clean your teeth. A running tap uses up to nine litres of water a minute.
    4. Wait until you have a full load before using your washing machine or your dishwasher. Some new washing machines use less than seven litres of water for each kilogramme of clothes, while modern dishwashers can use as little as 10 to 15 litres of water a cycle.
    5. If possible, take a shower instead of a bath. A five-minute shower uses about 40 litres of water. This is about half the volume of a standard bath.
    6. Use a water-saving device in your toilet cistern. Depending on the size of your cistern, you could save between one and three litres each time you flush the toilet.
    7. Using a watering can in the garden instead of a sprinkler or a hosepipe. Garden sprinklers and hosepipes left running can use between 500 and 1,000 litres of water an hour.
    8. Think about fitting a water butt to collect rainwater off your roof. Water butts usually store about 200 litres of water. As well as being better for watering your plants, using rainwater in the garden reduces the amount of treated water you use.
    9. Check your property regularly for leaks on your internal plumbing.

    What could be the hottest temperature in the UK this week?

    The incoming heatwave has led to the Met Office issuing an amber warning for extreme heats across parts of England and Wales, in place from Thursday 11 to Sunday 14 August.

    Met Office Deputy Chief Meteorologist Dan Rudman said: “Thanks to persistent high pressure over the UK, temperatures will be rising day-on-day through this week and an Extreme heat warning has been issued.

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    “Temperatures are expected to peak at 35C on Friday and Saturday, or even an isolated 36C on Saturday. Elsewhere will see temperatures widely into the high 20s and low 30s Celsius.

    “Coupled with the high daytime temperatures there will be some warm nights, with temperatures expected not to drop below the low 20s Celsius for some areas in the south.”